P179 Negotiation [Spring 1999]
MWF 11-12.10 Crown 203
Politics 179: Negotiation

This course is offered in the Department of Politics, University of California at Santa Cruz, in the Spring Quarter 1999. UC Santa Cruz students may take this course concurrently with the seminar Politics 190B Security and Disarmament, subject to availability of space.

Those not enrolled at UC Santa Cruz are welcome to follow the readings in either or both courses Politics 179 Negotiation and Politics 190B Security and Disarmament. Your attention is also called to Politics 161 War.


P179 Negotiation [Spring 1999] JUMP UP!

Politics 179: Negotiation. Related Courses and Link Tables,
Type URL Course Syllabus Table of Links
Negotiation http://www.learnworld.com/COURSES/P179/ Politics 179 Syllabus Table of Links
Security and
Disarmament
http://www.learnworld.com/COURSES/P190B/ Politics 190B Syllabus Table of Links
War http://www.learnworld.com/COURSES/P161/ Politics 161 Syllabus Table of Links
Denuclearization
Links
http://www.learnworld.com/ZNW/ZNW.Links.html ZNW Links


P179. NEGOTIATION
This course presents negotiation as the central practice of politics. It takes up negotiation as a practice by parties in conflict, a practice by parties seeking cooperative outcomes, and a practice by which social expectations and institutions are constructed. Case studies in the negotiation of international treaties will be examined with care. The course will then explore how the processes and institutions of law and the economy can be understood as special cases of ongoing, regulated negotiation. Finally, the course will consider the special problem of negotiation between parties who are not ‘equal‘ but, in some salient respect, are ‘strong‘ and ‘weak.‘
The Law of the Sea. United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea
Albin [ed]. American Behavioral Scientist, v 38 n 6, May 1995.
Burr, William. The Kissinger Transcripts
Druckman & Mitchell [eds]. Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, v 542, November 1995.
Fisher et al. Coping With International Conflict
Sanger. Ordering the Oceans
Schelling Strategy of Conflict
Scott. Weapons of the Week
Stein [ed]. Getting to the Table
Talbott. Endgame. The Inside Story of SALT II

Politics 179

Spring 1999

Professor Larkin

POLITICS 179: NEGOTIATION

This course presents negotiation as the central practice of politics. It takes up negotiation as a practice by parties in conflict, a practice by parties seeking cooperative outcomes, and a practice by which social expectations and institutions are constructed. Case studies in the negotiation of international treaties will be examined with care. The course will then explore how the processes and institutions of law and the economy can be understood as special cases of ongoing, regulated negotiation. Finally, the course will consider the special problem of negotiation between parties who are not ‘equal‘ but, in some salient respect, are ‘strong‘ and ‘weak.‘

PRACTICUM

Students will conduct one or more negotiation in teams, recording and analysing their moves.

REQUIRED BOOKS

Items marked [-] are recommended, not required.

Author Citation
The Law of the Sea. United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea with Index and Final Act of the Third United Nations Conference on the Law of the Sea (New York: St. Martin‘s Press, 1983).
Albin, Cecilia. American Behavioral Scientist, v 38 n 6, May 1995. Issue on “Negotiation and Global Security,”. [Contents]
Burr, William [ed]. The Kissinger Transcripts: The Top Secret Talks with Beijing & Moscow (The New Press, 1999).
Druckman, Daniel and Christopher Mitchell [eds]. Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, v 542, November 1995. Issue on "Flexibility in International Negotiation and Mediation." [Contents]
Fisher, Roger, Andrea Kupfer Schneider, Elizabeth Borgwardt and Brian Ganson. Coping with International Conflict: A Systematic Approach to Influence in International Negotiation [Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1996].
Sanger, Clyde. Ordering the Oceans: The Making of the Law of the Sea (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1987).
Schelling, Thomas. Strategy of Conflict [Oxford: Oxford University Press].
Scott, James C. Weapons of the Weak (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1985).
Stein, Janice Gross [ed]. Getting to the Table: The Processes of International Prenegotiation (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Universitiy Press, 1989).
Talbott, Strobe. Endgame: The Inside Story of SALT II (New York: Harper, 1980).


READING ASSIGNMENT WEEK-BY-WEEK

Week 1. Parties. Sites. Initiation. Status of results.

[+] Stein, Janice Gross [ed]. Getting to the Table: The Processes of International Prenegotiation (Baltimore: Johns Hopkins Universitiy Press, 1989).

[R] Mitchell, C. R. “The Structure of Negotiations,” in his The Structure of International Conflict (New York: St. Martin‘s Press, 1981), pp. 218-250.

Week 2. Model 1: Strategic bargaining.

[+] Burr, William [ed]. The Kissinger Transcripts: The Top Secret Talks with Beijing & Moscow (The New Press, 1999).

[+] Schelling, Thomas. Strategy of Conflict [Oxford: Oxford University Press]

[+] American Behavioral Scientist, v 38 n 6, May 1995. Issue on “Negotiation and Global Security,” edited by Cecilia Albin. [Cited as ABS.]

[R] Mitchell, C. R. "Settlement Strategies," in his The Structure of International Conflict (New York: St. Martin‘s Press, 1981), pp. 196-217..

Week 3. Model 2: Cooperative quest.

[+] Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, v 542, November 1995. Issue on "Flexibility in International Negotiation and Mediation," edited by Daniel Druckman and Christopher Mitchell. [Cited as Annals.]

[+] Fisher, Roger, Andrea Kupfer Schneider, Elizabeth Borgwardt and Brian Ganson. Coping with International Conflict: A Systematic Approach to Influence in International Negotiation [Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 1996].

[-] Fisher, Roger and William Ury. Getting to Yes (Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1981).

Week 4. Model 3: Collaborative interpretation and the construction of meaning.

[R] Apter, David E. “Yan‘an and the Narrative Reconstruction of Reality,” in Daedalus, Spring 1993, pp. 207-232. [ XXX]

[R] Hasian, Marouf, Jr., and Lisa A. Flores. “Children of the Stones: The Intifada and the Mythic Creation of the Palestinian State,” in The Southern Communication Journal, Winter 1997, v 62 n 2, p. 89-XXX. [ 1997 Southern States Communication Association. 1997 UMI Company.]

[R] Hay, Colin. “Narrating Crisis: The Discursive Construction of the ‘Winter of Discontent’”, in Sociology, May 1996, v 30 n 2, p. 253(25). [ 1996 British Sociological Association Publication Ltd (UK). 1996 Information Access Company.]

[R] Lustick, Ian. Review article: “Writing the Intifada: Collective Action in the Occupied Territories,” in World Politics, July 1993, v 45 n 4, pp. 560-594. [ 1993 Johns Hopkins University Press.]

[R] Oliverio, Annamarie. “The State of Injustice: The Politics of Terrorism and the Production of Order,” in International Journal of Comparative Sociology, June 1997, v 38 n 1-2, p.48(15). [ 1997 E. J. Brill (The Netherlands). 1997 Information Access Company.]

Week 5. Case 1: United Nations Conference on the Law of the Sea

[+] Sanger, Clyde. Ordering the Oceans: The Making of the Law of the Sea (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1987).

[+] The Law of the Sea. United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea with Index and Final Act of the Third United Natios Conference on the Law of the Sea (New York: St. Martin‘s Press, 1983).

Week 6. Case 2: SALT II Negotiation

[+] Talbott, Strobe. Endgame: The Inside Story of SALT II (New York: Harper, 1980).

Week 7. Legal System as Institutionalized Negotiation

[-] White, James Boyd. “Constituting a Culture of Argument: The Possibilities of American Law,” in his When Words Lose Their Meaning (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1984), pp. 231-274.

[R] Alter, Karen J. “The European Court’s political power,” in West European Politics, v XXX n XXX, pp. XXX.

Week 8. Economic System as a Complex Negotiation

Week 9. Political System as a Framework for Negotiation

[R] Winham, Gilbert R. “Negotiation as a Management Process,” in World Politics, v 30 n 1, October 1997. [Reprinted in Robert O. Mathews et al., International Conflicte and Conflict Management (Scarborough, Ontario: Prentice-Hall, 1984), pp. 465-479. [Original 1977 Princeton University Press.]

[R] Shepsle, Kenneth A. “Discretion, Institutions, and the Problem of Government Commitment,” in Pierre Bourdieu and James S. Coleman [eds], Social Theory for a Changing Society (Boulder: Westview Press, 1991), pp. 245-265.

Week 10. Justice and the Significance of Inequalities Between Parties

[+] I. William Zartman, “The Role of Justice in Global Security Negotiations”. [In ABS].

[-] Beitz, Charles R. “International Distributive Justice,” in his Political Theory and International Relations (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1979), pp. 125-183.

[+] Scott, James C. Weapons of the Weak (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1985).

Collections [contents]:

[+] American Behavioral Scientist, v 38 n 6, May 1995. Issue on “Negotiation and Global Security,” edited by Cecilia Albin. [Cited as ABS.]
  • Cecilia Albin, “Negotiation and Global Security”
  • Gwyn Prins, “Notes Toward the Definition of Global Security”
  • Wnfried Lang, “Negotiation in the Face of the Future”
  • Tom Farer, “New Players in the Old Game: The De Facto Expansion of Standing in Global Security Negotiations”
  • James Crawford, “Negotiating Global Security Threats in a World of Nation States: Issues and Problems of Sovereignty”
  • I. William Zartman, “The Role of Justice in Global Security Negotiations”
  • H. Peyton Young, “Dividing the Indivisible”
  • Cecilia Albin: The Global Security Challenge to Negotiation: Toward the New Agenda”

[+] Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science, v 542, November 1995. Issue on "Flexibility in International Negotiation and Mediation," edited by Daniel Druckman and Christopher Mitchell. [Cited as Annals.]

  • Daniel Druckman and Christopher Mitchell, “Flexibility in Negotiation and Mediation”
  • P. Terrence Hopmann, “Two Paradigms of Negotiation: Bargaining and Problem Solving”
  • Otomar J. Bartos, “Modeling Distributive and Integrative Negotiations”
  • Daniel Druckman, “Situational Levers of Position Change: Further Explorations”
  • Bertram I. Spector, “Creativity Heuristics for Impasse Resolution: Reframing Intractable Negotiations”
  • Dean G. Pruitt, “Flexibility in Conflict Episodes”
  • Lloyd Jensen, “Issue Flexibility in Negotiating Internal War”
  • Dennis J. D. Sandole, “Changing Ideologies in the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe”
  • Margaret G. Hermann, “Leaders, Leadership, and Flexibility: Influences on Heads of Government as Negotiators and Mdiators”
  • Johannes Bates and Christopher Mitchell, “Constraints on Third Party Flexibility”
  • Nimet Beriker Atiyas, “Mediating Regional Conflicts and Negotiating Flexibility: Peace Efforts in Bosnia-Herzegovina“
  • Saadia Touval, “Mediator‘s Flexibility and the UN Security Council”
  • Christopher Mitchell and Daniel Druckman, “Flexibility: Nature, Sources, and Effects”

TERM PAPER AND FINAL EXAMINATION

Students will write a 20-page term paper [see below]. There will be a two-hour in-class final, consisting of two one-hour essays, in which students will be asked to display both reasoned argument and their readiness to cite appropriately from among the authors read. It is necessary to pass the final examination to pass the course.

CONTACTING CLASS MEMBERS

A classlist will be posted at

This class [like the related class P190B] has a dedicated newsgroup, on the server 205.179.103.250. The newsgroup names are You can read and post to both newsgroups. Just bear in mind that they are universally accessible. However, they are not ‘broadcast’, so in order to use them you must include the server among those which your newsreader software, such as Netscape’s Messenger facility, opens.

CONTACTING THE INSTRUCTOR

The easiest way to reach me is by email to larkin@learnworld.com My office is Cowell 183 [southwest corner of the Cowell College Library]. Telephone: 831-459-2608. Fax: 831-459-4880. Office hours will be announced at the start of class.

TERM PAPER

Choose a text, or group of related texts, or selection(s) from a text, which reproduces a negotiation verbatim. Illustrative examples of such texts: a court transcript, a Congressional debate (from the Congressional Record), the script of a play, a British Parliamentary Select Committee report of testimony, the Nixon tapes, [subject to consent] negotiations among your housemates, [subject to consent] a public hearing. You can range imaginatively in your choice of negotiation. Analyse and assess the negotiation. The analysis should be close and deep, examining both substance and the ways in which meaning itself is negotiated. The assessment should look not only at such close details, but at the structure, movement, and outcome of the negotiation. In class we will discuss how best to share the verbatim text and your drafts with other class members. The final paper is due 1 June.